acm - an acm publication

Ubiquity Staff Collection

  • Mihai Nadin on Anticipatory Systems
    What is the difference between a falling stone and a falling cat? Mihai Nadin, who directs the newly established Institute for Research in Anticipatory Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas, holds a Ph.D. degree in aesthetics from the University of Bucharest and a post-doctoral degree in philosophy, logic and theory of science from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, West Germany. He earned an M.S. degree in electronics and computer science from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Bucharest. He has authored 23 books, including "The Civilization of Illiteracy," "Mind: Anticipation and Chaos," and "Anticipation: The End is Where We Start From." ...
  • Patterns for Success
    Scott D. Anthony speaks about using innovation theory to transform organizations and create the next wave of growth. Anthony is a partner at Innosight, a management, consulting and education company located in Watertown, Massachusetts, and is co-author with Clayton M. Christensen and Erik A. Roth of the new book, "Seeing What's Next: Using the Theories of Innovation to Predict Industry Change." ...
  • Checking in with Ben Bederson
    By focusing on the user experience, the University of Maryland's Human-Computer Interaction Lab aims to improve lives through projects such as the International Children's Digital Library. Benjamin B. Bederson, interviewed here, is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. His work is on information visualization, interaction strategies, and digital libraries. ...
  • An Interview with Vaughan Merlyn on Management
    Vaughan Merlyn, who is a management consultant, researcher, and author, has had as his primary focus for more than three decades now has been the use of information and information technology for business value creation. He was interviewed about software consulting and management. ...
  • An Interview with Michael Schrage on Ubiquity
    Author of several acclaimed books and numerous articles in such publications as Fortune and Technology Review, Michael Schrage is also a world-traveling consultant to all businesses great and small. He has been at MIT for many years, and his new academic home will be in that institution's Sloan Management School. ...
  • An Interview with Michael Schrage
    It is November 2008 and much of the globe is in the throes of recession. Innovation is on many minds. We need new products and new services generating new value for our customers and our companies. It is more important than ever to innovate. The problem is that our collective success rate is abysmal -- 4 percent according to Business Week in August 2005. As we set out on new innovation initiatives, it is a good time to reflect on the illusions that drag our success rates so low. One illusion is that is innovation is a novel ideal or product, another is that those who spend more on R&D get more innovation, and another is that innovation is about great inventions. Michael Schrage of MIT has been challenging these illusions for a long time. He discussed them with Ubiquity editor John Gehl in February 2006. Now is the perfect time to reflect again on what Michael has to say to us about innovation. --Peter Denning, Editor ...
  • An Interview with Terry Winograd: Convergence, Ambient Technology, and Success in Innovation
    Terry Winograd is Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, where he directs the program on human-computer interaction. His SHRDLU program done at the MIT AI Lab was one of the early explorations in natural language understanding by computers. His book with Fernando Flores, Understanding Computers and Cognition, critiqued the underlying assumptions of AI and much of computer system design, and led to completely new directions in those fields. He was a founder and national president of Computer Professionals for Responsibility. His remarks, made in 2002, are as relevant today as they were when first spoken. ...
  • An Interview with Richard A. Demillo
    Richard A. DeMillo is the Dean of Georgia Tech's College of Computing. He previously was Hewlett-Packard's chief technology officer and served as director of the Georgia Tech Information Security Center. Under DeMillo's leadership, Georgia Tech's College of Computing has replaced the core curriculum for undergraduates with an ambitious and innovative Threads program, as he explains in this interview with Ubiquity's editor-in-chief John Gehl. ...
  • An Interview with Wei Zhao
    Wei Zhao is currently the Dean of the School of Science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Before he joined RPI in 2007, he was a Senior Associate Vice President for Research at Texas A&M University. Between 2005 and 2007, he also served as the Director for the Division of Computer and Network Systems in the National Science Foundation. He completed his undergraduate program in physics at Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, China, in 1977. He received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer and Information Sciences at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1983 and 1986, respectively. During his career, he has also served as a faculty member at Amherst College, the University of Adelaide, and Texas A&M University. This interview was conducted by Ubiquity editor-in-chief John Gehl. ...
  • Interview with MIT's Robert Langer
    Dr. Robert Langers work is at the interface of biotechnology and materials science. A major focus is the study and development of polymers to deliver drugs, particularly genetically engineered proteins, DNA and RNAi, continuously at controlled rates for prolonged periods of time. ...
  • Ubiquity interview with Neumont's Graham Doxey
    Neumont University in Salt Lake City was featured in Ubiquity two years ago, with an interview with one of its founders, Scott McKinley. We wanted to go back and see how they're doing at this new and unique institution, about which senior vice president Julie Blake has explained: "The industry has said for years that even our best universities aren't preparing students for the workplace. Neumont was founded to fill that niche." Below is a Ubiquity interview with Neumont cofounder and President Graham Doxey. ...
  • Mailbag
    In his article 'Artificial and Biological Intelligence,' Subhash Kak of Louisiana State University asks if 'humans will eventually create silicon machines with minds that will slowly spread all over the world, and the entire universe will eventually become a conscious machine?' These are some comments on his paper. ...
  • An Interview with Scott McKinley: Project-Based Learning: The Neumont University story
    Neumont University co-founder and CEO Scott McKinley says the most innovative aspect of the Neumont curriculum is its focus on student projects: "Our freshmen are on project teams from the very beginning. Their first projects are simple, heavily scaffolded, and commensurate with their novice skills. By the time they enter their last three quarters, they're working on real industry projects for serious names that work with us, including IBM and Microsoft." ...
  • An Interview with William P. Dunk: On Collaboration
    Management consultant and futurist William P. Dunk says, "What collaboration is about is distributed intelligence, and I think that systems and governments and companies are all in such a degree of gridlock now that we desperately need to have broad-based intelligence coming into play everywhere." ...
  • An Interview with Alan Lenton: On Games
    Noted U.K. game designer Alan Lenton talks about his award-winning multi-player game Federation and discusses the sociology and psychology of gaming. ...
  • An Interview with John Markoff: What the dormouse said
    John Markoff is author of the new best-seller "What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry," and is a senior writer for The New York Times. His other books include "Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hackers on the Computer Frontier" and "Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America's Most Wanted Computer Outlaw." ...
  • An Interview with Leonard Kleinrock on nomadic computing
    Leonard Kleinrock developed the mathematical theory of packet-switching, the technology underpinning the Internet, while a graduate student at MIT a decade before the birth of the Internet which occurred when his host computer at UCLA became the first node of the Internet in September 1969. He is now at UCLA, where he is Professor of Computer Science. He has won numerous awards and prizes for his achievements. ...
  • An Interview with F-H Hsu: Chess, China, and Education
    Feng-Hsiung Hsu, whose book "Behind Deep Blue" told the story of world chess champion Garry Kasparov was defeated by the IBM computer known as Deep Blue, is now a senior manager and researcher at Microsoft Research Asia. ...
  • Ken Robinson on Telecom Policy
    Ken Robinson is a communications attorney in Washington, having worked at the Departments of Justice and Commerce, the FCC, and the Office of Telecommunications Policy during the Nixon Administration. He is editor of the weekly publication 'Telecommunications Policy Review.' ...
  • Building smarter: an interview with Jerry Laiserin
    Architect and industry analyst Jerry Laiserin is an advocate for "building smarter" - the application of information technology to transform the way the built environment is designed, constructed and operated. His technology strategy publication, the LaiserinLetter, can be found at. ...
  • Leonard and Swap on 'Deep Smarts'
    An interview with Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap: The first issue that any organization has to face is the identification of the deep smarts. Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap are co-authors of the new book 'Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer Enduring Business Wisdom.' Leonard is a professor emerita at the Harvard Business School and Swap is a professor of psychology emeritus at Tufts, where he was also dean of the college. ...
  • Anita McGahan on Industry Evolution
    Anita M. McGahan is author of the new book 'How Industries Evolve: Principles for Achieving and Sustaining Superior Performance' (Harvard Business School Press). She is the Everett V. Lord Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Strategy & Policy at the Boston University School of Management, as well as a Senior Institute Associate at Harvard's Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness. ...
  • Ken Sevcik on Performance Evaluation
    Ken Sevcik is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He received his B.S. in 1966 from Stanford University and his PhD in 1971 from the University of Chicago. Sevcik joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1971, and was Chair of the Department from 1990 to 1992. He also served as Director of the Computer Systems Research Institute (CSRI). His research interests are in the use of analytic models for performance analysis of resource allocation, scheduling and file structures in computer systems, computer networks, and distributed data management systems. ...
  • You should use both sides of your brain, right?
    Author Dan Pink argues that "nowadays, the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't is going to be mastery of these abilities that are more characteristic of the right hemisphere — artistry, empathy, big picture thinking. Those are the sorts of abilities that I think are really going to matter the most, not only in our individual career success, but also in our personal satisfaction." ...
  • Joseph Konstan on Human-Computer Interaction: Recommender Systems, Collaboration and Social Good
    An interview with Joseph Konstan: Konstan is an associate professor of computer science at the University of Minnesota. His background includes a bachelor's degree from Harvard College and a PhD from the University of California-Berkeley. His principal interests are human-computer interaction, recommender systems, multimedia systems, information visualization, internet applications and interfaces. ...
  • Mihai Nadin on Anticipatory Systems
    What is the difference between a falling stone and a falling cat? Mihai Nadin, who directs the newly established Institute for Research in Anticipatory Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas, holds a Ph.D. degree in aesthetics from the University of Bucharest and a post-doctoral degree in philosophy, logic and theory of science from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, West Germany. He earned an M.S. degree in electronics and computer science from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Bucharest. He has authored 23 books, including "The Civilization of Illiteracy," "Mind: Anticipation and Chaos," and "Anticipation: The End is Where We Start From." ...
  • Czerwinski on Vizualization
    Mary Czerwinski is Senior Researcher and Group Manager Visualization and Interaction Research Group at Microsoft Research. ...
  • Michael Schrage on Innovation
    Looking for the great clients who are the true innovators? Co-director of the MIT Media Lab's eMarkets Initiative, a senior advisor to MIT's Security Studies Program, and a consultant to MIT's Langer Labs on technology transfer issues, Michael Schrage conducts research on the economics of innovation. His particular focus is on the role of models, prototypes and simulations in managing interactive iterative design, an area in which he works with a number of companies. ...
  • An Interview with Joichi Ito: The world wide blog
    Joichi Ito, founder of Neoteny and other Internet companies, finds that cyberspace is embracing it roots — collaboration, community, and personal communications — with bloggers leading the way. ...
  • S. Joy mountford on interface design
    The ultimate technology world will be soft, flexible and addressable. But the issues will remain the same, according to interface designer S. Joy Mountford: What do people like and what do people want? ...
  • An Interview with Steven Weber: Why open source works
    Author Steven Weber looks beyond the hype on Open Source. More than a self-governing utopia, it's a practical, sustainable way of organizing and innovating. Its method may soon be applied successfully in other sectors. Plus, a "crazy" idea for Microsoft. ...
  • Roger Brent and the alpha project
    The work of a multidisciplinary genomic research lab in Berkeley may yield big changes in drug therapy and medicine. Roger Brent is President and Research Director of the Molecular Sciences Institute, an independent nonprofit research laboratory in Berkeley, CA, that combines genomic experimentation with computer modeling. The mission of the MSI is to predict the behavior of cells and organisms in response to defined genetic and environmental changes. ...
  • An Interview with Jesse Poore: Correct by design
    Jesse Poore suggests a revolution in programming - holding software developers to the same level of rigor of training and workmanship as other professionals, developing software that's correct by design, and constraining the release of software-intensive products until they are scientifically certified as fit for use. ...
  • Esther Dyson ... In focus
    Venture capitalist Esther Dyson is the chairman of EDventure Holdings, which publishes the influential monthly computer-industry newsletter Release 1.0 as well as the blog Release 4.0. The company also organizes the high-profile technology conference PC (Platforms for Communications) Forum, March 21-23, 2004. In this interview, she discusses her current interests, many to be covered at PC Forum. They include her investments, how to stop spam, outsourcing, and the overall high-tech industry environment. ...
  • An Interview with Peter Denning: The great principles of computing
    Peter Denning teaches students at the Naval Postgraduate School how to develop strategic, big-picture thinking about the field of computing. Denning, a past president of ACM (1980-82), has been involved with communicating our discipline, computing, to outsiders since 1970. Along the way he invented the working set model for memory management, developed the theory of virtual memory, promulgated operating systems theory, co-invented operational analysis of system performance, co-founded CSNET, and led the ACM Publications Board while it developed the Digital Library. He is an ACM Fellow and holds five major ACM awards. He just completed a five-year term as chair of the ACM Education Board. ...
  • An Interview with Thomas Kalil: Where politics, policy, technology and science converge
    From the White House to Berkeley, Thomas Kalil has worked on shaping the national agenda for science and technology research initiatives. Kalil, President Clinton's former science and technology advisor, now holds a similar post at the University of California, Berkeley, where he helps develop new research initiatives and increase UC Berkeley's role in shaping the national agenda. ...
  • Talking with Ben Chi of NYSERNet
    How the Internet began in New York State, the current state of Internet2, and the remote possibility of Internet3 ...
  • A whole new worldview
    Anthropologist Christopher Kelty on programmers, networks and information technology ...
  • An Interview with David Rejeski: Making policy in a Moore's Law world
    The accelerated rate of scientific discovery and technological innovation makes it difficult to keep up with the pace of change. What do policymakers know of nanotechnology and genetic modification? David Rejeski helps government agencies anticipate emerging technological issues. ...
  • A designing life: Blade Kotelly
    A speech-recognition software expert explains the difference between good design and ambiguity, how good designs go bad, and why everyone is a designer. ...
  • Building an inventive organization
    A creativity expert distinguishes the concept of creativity from that of innovation and discusses how to create a corporate culture that really fosters creativity ...
  • The Virtues of Virtual
    Abbe Mowshowitz talks about virtual organization as way of managing activities and describes the rise of virtual feudalism. ...
  • A model of democracy
    When can you have freedom, equality, moral reciprocity and a paycheck? Brook Manville on the surprising blueprint for organizational management. ...
  • Do you know what's in your project portfolio?
    Cathleen Benko and Warren McFarlan, authors of "Connecting the Dots: Aligning Projects with Objectives in Unpredictable Times" discuss the dangers of ignoring your IT portfolio. ...
  • Beyond numbers
    Martha Amram on the current economics of technology investment. ...
  • The new computing
    Ben Shneiderman on how designers can help people succeed. ...
  • Robert Aiken on the future of learning
    In the hands of skilled teachers, technology will provide students with the best possible education -- both face-to-face and distant, collaborative and individualized, and entertaining and instructional. ...
  • Talking with John Stuckey
    A conversation with the Director of University Computing at Washington and Lee University ...
  • Putting it all together with Robert Kahn
    The co-founder of the Internet recalls the non-commercial early days and looks at today's issues of fair use, privacy and the need for security. ...
  • Inside PARC
    Johan de Kleer talks about knowledge tracking, smart matter and other new developments in AI. ...
  • A conversation with Ruby Lee
    Innovative computer scientist Ruby Lee talks about secure information processing, efficient permutations, fair use in the digital age, and more. ...
  • Complexity in the interface Age: An Interview with Jeremy J. Shapiro
    Do you control technology or does it control you? Jeremy J. Shapiro talks about the power struggle in machine/human relationships and what it means today to be information-technology literate. Shapiro is a faculty member in the Human and Organization Development Program at the Fielding Graduate Institute. ...
  • Complexity in the interface age
    Do you control technology or does it control you? Jeremy J. Shapiro talks about the power struggle in machine/human relationships and what it means today to be information-technology literate. Shapiro is a faculty member in the Human and Organization Development Program at the Fielding Graduate Institute. ...
  • Computer science meets economics
    Yale's Joan Feigenbaum talks about the possibilities for interdisciplinary research, the new field of algorithmic mechanism design, and her radical views on security. ...
  • What's in a name? Ask yahoo!
    A company's brand is one of its most valuable assets, one that few high tech companies -- most recently HP and Compaq -- understand how to leverage, according to Sam Hill. Hill is co-author (with Chris Lederer) of the new book, The Infinite Asset: Managing Brands to Build New Value. He is the former chief marketing officer at Booz Allen & Hamilton and currently a partner at Helios Consulting Group and also co-author of Radical Marketing, now in its fourth printing. ...
  • Think globally, act strategically
    John Parkinson relays the challenges for a global financial services firm including anticipating technologies, winning the war for talent, and finding innovative ways to maintain a corporate presence in a worldwide market. ...
  • Intel's inside track
    Annabelle Gawer on the surprising sources of leadership in interdependent environments. ...
  • Sold!
    Ajit Kambil on the inevitable, strategic use of electronic markets and auctions. ...