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Interviews are organized by the month and year in which they first appeared. To find an interviewee by name, use the search bar (at upper right).

Interviews

2005

  • An Interview with Scott McKinley: Project-Based Learning: The Neumont University story
    Neumont University co-founder and CEO Scott McKinley says the most innovative aspect of the Neumont curriculum is its focus on student projects: "Our freshmen are on project teams from the very beginning. Their first projects are simple, heavily scaffolded, and commensurate with their novice skills. By the time they enter their last three quarters, they're working on real industry projects for serious names that work with us, including IBM and Microsoft."
  • An Interview with William P. Dunk: On Collaboration
    Management consultant and futurist William P. Dunk says, "What collaboration is about is distributed intelligence, and I think that systems and governments and companies are all in such a degree of gridlock now that we desperately need to have broad-based intelligence coming into play everywhere."
  • An Interview with Alan Lenton: On Games
    Noted U.K. game designer Alan Lenton talks about his award-winning multi-player game Federation and discusses the sociology and psychology of gaming.
  • An Interview with John Markoff: What the dormouse said
    John Markoff is author of the new best-seller "What the Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry," and is a senior writer for The New York Times. His other books include "Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hackers on the Computer Frontier" and "Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, America's Most Wanted Computer Outlaw."
  • An Interview with F-H Hsu: Chess, China, and Education
    Feng-Hsiung Hsu, whose book "Behind Deep Blue" told the story of world chess champion Garry Kasparov was defeated by the IBM computer known as Deep Blue, is now a senior manager and researcher at Microsoft Research Asia.
  • An Interview with Leonard Kleinrock on nomadic computing
    Leonard Kleinrock developed the mathematical theory of packet-switching, the technology underpinning the Internet, while a graduate student at MIT a decade before the birth of the Internet which occurred when his host computer at UCLA became the first node of the Internet in September 1969. He is now at UCLA, where he is Professor of Computer Science. He has won numerous awards and prizes for his achievements.
  • You should use both sides of your brain, right?
    Author Dan Pink argues that "nowadays, the fault line between who gets ahead and who doesn't is going to be mastery of these abilities that are more characteristic of the right hemisphere — artistry, empathy, big picture thinking. Those are the sorts of abilities that I think are really going to matter the most, not only in our individual career success, but also in our personal satisfaction."
  • Building smarter: an interview with Jerry Laiserin
    Architect and industry analyst Jerry Laiserin is an advocate for "building smarter" - the application of information technology to transform the way the built environment is designed, constructed and operated. His technology strategy publication, the LaiserinLetter, can be found at.
  • Joseph Konstan on Human-Computer Interaction: Recommender Systems, Collaboration and Social Good
    An interview with Joseph Konstan: Konstan is an associate professor of computer science at the University of Minnesota. His background includes a bachelor's degree from Harvard College and a PhD from the University of California-Berkeley. His principal interests are human-computer interaction, recommender systems, multimedia systems, information visualization, internet applications and interfaces.
  • Leonard and Swap on 'Deep Smarts'
    An interview with Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap: The first issue that any organization has to face is the identification of the deep smarts. Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap are co-authors of the new book 'Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer Enduring Business Wisdom.' Leonard is a professor emerita at the Harvard Business School and Swap is a professor of psychology emeritus at Tufts, where he was also dean of the college.
  • Ken Sevcik on Performance Evaluation
    Ken Sevcik is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He received his B.S. in 1966 from Stanford University and his PhD in 1971 from the University of Chicago. Sevcik joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1971, and was Chair of the Department from 1990 to 1992. He also served as Director of the Computer Systems Research Institute (CSRI). His research interests are in the use of analytic models for performance analysis of resource allocation, scheduling and file structures in computer systems, computer networks, and distributed data management systems.
  • Anita McGahan on Industry Evolution
    Anita M. McGahan is author of the new book 'How Industries Evolve: Principles for Achieving and Sustaining Superior Performance' (Harvard Business School Press). She is the Everett V. Lord Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Strategy & Policy at the Boston University School of Management, as well as a Senior Institute Associate at Harvard's Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness.
  • Ken Robinson on Telecom Policy
    Ken Robinson is a communications attorney in Washington, having worked at the Departments of Justice and Commerce, the FCC, and the Office of Telecommunications Policy during the Nixon Administration. He is editor of the weekly publication 'Telecommunications Policy Review.'
  • Czerwinski on Vizualization
    Mary Czerwinski is Senior Researcher and Group Manager Visualization and Interaction Research Group at Microsoft Research.
  • Mihai Nadin on Anticipatory Systems
    What is the difference between a falling stone and a falling cat? Mihai Nadin, who directs the newly established Institute for Research in Anticipatory Systems at the University of Texas at Dallas, holds a Ph.D. degree in aesthetics from the University of Bucharest and a post-doctoral degree in philosophy, logic and theory of science from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, West Germany. He earned an M.S. degree in electronics and computer science from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest and an M.A. degree in philosophy from the University of Bucharest. He has authored 23 books, including "The Civilization of Illiteracy," "Mind: Anticipation and Chaos," and "Anticipation: The End is Where We Start From."