acm - an acm publication
Follow us on social media...

Peter J. Denning, Editor in ChiefThe digitally connected world has become a large, swirling sea of information stripped of context.

We help our readers make sense of it, find meaning in it, learn what to trust, and prepare for the future that may show up. "Ubiquity and Your Future

Peter J. Denning,
Editor-in-Chief

Ubiquity Upgrades!

LATEST ARTICLES

Check back weekly for new articles featured in the Workings of Science Symposium!

opinion

Workings of science: Is engineering applied science?

by Sharad Sinha

There is often a debate to differentiate between science and engineering. There is also the view that engineering can be considered applied science. Drawing arguments based on historical developments, this article shows that both science and engineering complement each other. Hence, the question of one being the cause or the effect of the other does not arise.

...


opinion

Just who do I think I am?

by Philip Yaffe

Good advice is good advice no matter the source. However, knowing something about its source can significantly reinforce one's desire to put that good advice into practice. ...



opinion

Workings of science: AI in 2156: the science of intelligence

by Kemal A. Delic, Jeff A. Riley

AI has been with us for a long time—from its first beginnings in ancient times in the form of automatons and other devices mimicking humans or other animals, through the middle of the last century when the term "artificial intelligence was actually coined, to the present times where it (the label rather than the actual technology) is entering the psyche of the general public. This article explores the notion that the technology we call AI is not yet ripe but is establishing itself as a science in its own right, and that by 2156—the 200-year anniversary of the coining of the term—the technology should be in a position to deliver on its promises. ...


opinion

Workings of science: Is science limited to the sciences?

by Philip Yaffe

Albert Einstein once said, "The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking." This thought was echoed by Carl Sagan, who said, "Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them." These observations, and those of numerous other intellectual luminaries, strongly suggest that the common distinction made between what is science and non-science, say between physics and history, is more apparent than real. These, of course, are personal opinions based on personal observations This essay explores the intriguing idea that virtually everything is science. It also provides some recent scientific evidence that trying to distinguish between science and non-science is not only fruitless but can also do real harm to individuals and society as a whole.

...