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2016 Symposia

A Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

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Ubiquity Symposium: The Internet of Things

Table of Contents

  1. The Third Wave (Opening Statement) by Kemal Delic
  2. Discovery in the Internet of Things by Arkady Zaslavsky and Prem Prakash Jayaraman
  3. W3C Plans for Developing Standards for Open Markets of Services for the IoT  by Dave Raggett
  4. Standards for Tomorrow by Dejan Milojicic, Paul Nikolich, and Barry Leiba
  5. A Case for Interoperable IoT Sensor Data and Meta-data Formats by Milan Milenkovic
  6. Programmable IoT: On The role of APIs in IoT by Maja Vukovic
  7. Fog Computing Distributing Data and Intelligence for Resiliency and Scale Necessary for IoT by Charles Byers and Patrick Wetterwald
  8. Evolution and Disruption in Network Processing for The Internet of Things by Lorenzo di Gregorio
  9. The Importance of Cross-Layer Considerations in a Standardized WSN Protocol Stack Aiming for IoT by Bogdan Pavkovic, Marko Batic, and Nikola Tomasevic
  10. Using Redundancy to Detect Security Anomalies Toward IoT Security Attack Detectors by Mladen A. Vouk and Roopak Venkatakrishnan
  11. Ensuring Trust and Security in the Industrial IoT by Bernardo A. Huberman
  12. On Resilience of IoT Systems by Kemal Delic
  13. IoT in Energy Efficiency by Francois Jammes
  14. IoT: Promises, Perils, Perspectives (Closing Statement) by Kemal Delic

Symposia

2016

  • Internet of Things in Energy Efficiency: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    This paper aims to provide the view of what means IoT (Internet of Things) in energy efficiency applications, of its technical and business impacts, of its opportunities and risks for the different market players. It is concluded by the author's long term vision about the use of IoT in energy efficiency applications.

  • On Resilience of IoT Systems: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    At the very high level of abstraction, the Internet of Things (IoT) can be modeled as the hyper-scale, hyper-complex cyber-physical system. Study of resilience of IoT systems is the first step towards engineering of the future IoT eco-systems. Exploration of this domain is highly promising avenue for many aspiring Ph.D. and M.Sc. students.

  • Ensuring Trust and Security in the Industrial IoT: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    Industrial Internet of Things (IOT) is a distributed network of smart sensors that enables precise control and monitoring of complex processes over arbitrary distances. The great advantage of the industrial IoT is counterbalanced by a security weakness. The insertion of a smart device capable of extracting protected data or malicious actions can infect the whole network with relative ease. Thus it becomes imperative to discover whether or not new devices have the right capabilities and compatibilities with other sensors. This article presents a zero knowledge protocol that achieves precisely that objective while keeping the sensor data private.

  • Using Redundancy to Detect Security Anomalies: Towards IoT security attack detectors: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    Cyber-attacks and breaches are often detected too late to avoid damage. While "classical" reactive cyber defenses usually work only if we have some prior knowledge about the attack methods and "allowable" patterns, properly constructed redundancy-based anomaly detectors can be more robust and often able to detect even zero day attacks. They are a step toward an oracle that uses knowable behavior of a healthy system to identify abnormalities. In the world of Internet of Things (IoT), security, and anomalous behavior of sensors and other IoT components, will be orders of magnitude more difficult unless we make those elements security aware from the start. In this article we examine the ability of redundancy-based anomaly detectors to recognize some high-risk and difficult to detect attacks on web servers---a likely management interface for many IoT stand-alone elements. In real life, it has taken long, a number of years in some cases, to identify some of the vulnerabilities and related attacks. We discuss practical relevance of the approach in the context of providing high-assurance Web-services that may belong to autonomous IoT applications and devices.