acm - an acm publication

2020 - March

  • Students implement the European Student Card

    Student mobility is a shared goal of the member states of the European Union. One ingredient that makes student mobility possible is a universal student ID card that is accepted everywhere and can be coded with services at the institutions visited. The European Student Card (ESC) is such a universal ID card, standardized in Europe. A team of students from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology developed the software for it. It works as follows: A student with an ESC simply walks up to a self-service kiosk, presents the card to a reader, and then selects the desired services, such as cafeteria, library, lab access, etc. In this interview, the development team will explain how they made this work smoothly, including the security considerations. This project is another example of how undergraduate students can build impressive software if given a challenge, the right tools, and some supervision.

  • A conversation with Jesmin Jahan: overcoming the compute versus communication scalability wall

    In this series of interviews with innovation leaders, Ubiquity Associate Editor and software engineer, Dr. Bushra Anjum sits down with Dr. Jesmin Jahan Tithi, a research scientist in the Parallel Computing Labs at Intel, to discuss overcoming the scaling wall that is thwarting application efficiency, specifically within high-performance computing.

  • The purpose of punctuation

    Each "Communication Corner" essay is self-contained; however, they build on each other. For best results, before reading this essay and doing the exercise, go to the first essay "How an Ugly Duckling Became a Swan," then read each succeeding essay.

    Language is ever changing as geographic boundaries morph and populations age. So-called grammar rules can often be arbitrary. Good writing sometimes means using punctuation and sometimes not.

2018 Symposia

Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

To organize a symposium, please read our guidelines.

 

Ubiquity Symposium: Big Data

Table of Contents

  1. Big Data, Digitization, and Social Change (Opening Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic
  2. Big Data and the Attention Economy by Bernardo A. Huberman
  3. Big Data for Social Science Research by Mark Birkin
  4. Technology and Business Challenges of Big Data in the Digital Economy by Dave Penkler
  5. High Performance Synthetic Information Environments: An integrating architecture in the age of pervasive data and computing By Christopher L. Barrett, Jeffery Johnson, and Madhav Marathe
  6. Developing an Open Source "Big Data" Cognitive Computing Platform by Michael Kowolenko and Mladen Vouk
  7. When Good Machine Learning Leads to Bad Cyber Security by Tegjyot Singh Sethi and Mehmed Kantardzic
  8. Corporate Security is a Big Data Problem by Louisa Saunier and Kemal Delic
  9. Big Data: Business, technology, education, and science by Jeffrey Johnson, Luca Tesei, Marco Piangerelli, Emanuela Merelli, Riccardo Paci, Nenad Stojanovic, Paulo Leitão, José Barbosa, and Marco Amador
  10. Big Data or Big Brother? That is the question now (Closing Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic