acm - an acm publication

2014 - August

  • MOOCs: Symptom, Not Cause of Disruption: MOOCs and technology to advance learning and learning research (Ubiquity symposium)
    Is the MOOCs phenomenon a disruptive innovation or a transient bubble? It may be partly both. Broadcasting lectures and opening up courses via MOOCs by itself poses little change of the academic status quo. But academia is part of a broader academic-bureaucratic complex that provided a core framework for industrial-age institutions. The academic-bureaucratic complex rests on the premise that knowledge and talent must be scarce. Presumed scarcity justifies filtering access to information, to diplomas, and to jobs. But a wave of post-industrial technical, economic, and social innovations is making knowledge and talent rapidly more abundant and access more "open." This mega-trend is driving the academic-bureaucratic complex toward bankruptcy. It is being replaced by new, radically different arrangements of learning and work. The embrace of MOOCs is a symptom, not a cause of academia's obsolescence.
  • GPUs: High-performance Accelerators for Parallel Applications: The multicore transformation (Ubiquity symposium)
    Early graphical processing units (GPUs) were designed as high compute density, fixed-function processors ideally crafted to the needs of computer graphics workloads. Today, GPUs are becoming truly first-class computing elements on par with CPUs. Programming GPUs as self-sufficient general-purpose processors is not only hypothetically desirable, but feasible and efficient in practice, opening new opportunities for integration of GPUs in complex software systems.

2018 Symposia

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Ubiquity Symposium: Big Data

Table of Contents

  1. Big Data, Digitization, and Social Change (Opening Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic
  2. Big Data and the Attention Economy by Bernardo A. Huberman
  3. Big Data for Social Science Research by Mark Birkin
  4. Technology and Business Challenges of Big Data in the Digital Economy by Dave Penkler
  5. High Performance Synthetic Information Environments: An integrating architecture in the age of pervasive data and computing By Christopher L. Barrett, Jeffery Johnson, and Madhav Marathe
  6. Developing an Open Source "Big Data" Cognitive Computing Platform by Michael Kowolenko and Mladen Vouk
  7. When Good Machine Learning Leads to Bad Cyber Security by Tegjyot Singh Sethi and Mehmed Kantardzic
  8. Corporate Security is a Big Data Problem by Louisa Saunier and Kemal Delic
  9. Big Data: Business, technology, education, and science by Jeffrey Johnson, Luca Tesei, Marco Piangerelli, Emanuela Merelli, Riccardo Paci, Nenad Stojanovic, Paulo Leitão, José Barbosa, and Marco Amador
  10. Big Data or Big Brother? That is the question now (Closing Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic