acm - an acm publication

2005 - February

  • Ken Sevcik on Performance Evaluation
    Ken Sevcik is Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto. He received his B.S. in 1966 from Stanford University and his PhD in 1971 from the University of Chicago. Sevcik joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 1971, and was Chair of the Department from 1990 to 1992. He also served as Director of the Computer Systems Research Institute (CSRI). His research interests are in the use of analytic models for performance analysis of resource allocation, scheduling and file structures in computer systems, computer networks, and distributed data management systems.
  • A Concise Guide to the Major Internet Bodies
    The bodies responsible for the Internet's protocols and parameters can be said to steer the Internet in a significant sense. This document, by Alex Simonelis of Dawson College in Montreal, is a summary of those bodies and their most important characteristics.
  • Leonard and Swap on 'Deep Smarts'
    An interview with Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap: The first issue that any organization has to face is the identification of the deep smarts. Dorothy Leonard and Walter Swap are co-authors of the new book 'Deep Smarts: How to Cultivate and Transfer Enduring Business Wisdom.' Leonard is a professor emerita at the Harvard Business School and Swap is a professor of psychology emeritus at Tufts, where he was also dean of the college.
  • Ken Robinson on Telecom Policy
    Ken Robinson is a communications attorney in Washington, having worked at the Departments of Justice and Commerce, the FCC, and the Office of Telecommunications Policy during the Nixon Administration. He is editor of the weekly publication 'Telecommunications Policy Review.'
  • Anita McGahan on Industry Evolution
    Anita M. McGahan is author of the new book 'How Industries Evolve: Principles for Achieving and Sustaining Superior Performance' (Harvard Business School Press). She is the Everett V. Lord Distinguished Faculty Scholar and Professor of Strategy & Policy at the Boston University School of Management, as well as a Senior Institute Associate at Harvard's Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness.

2018 Symposia

Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

To organize a symposium, please read our guidelines.

 

Ubiquity Symposium: Big Data

Table of Contents

  1. Big Data, Digitization, and Social Change (Opening Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic
  2. Big Data and the Attention Economy by Bernardo A. Huberman
  3. Big Data for Social Science Research by Mark Birkin
  4. Technology and Business Challenges of Big Data in the Digital Economy by Dave Penkler
  5. High Performance Synthetic Information Environments: An integrating architecture in the age of pervasive data and computing By Christopher L. Barrett, Jeffery Johnson, and Madhav Marathe
  6. Developing an Open Source "Big Data" Cognitive Computing Platform by Michael Kowolenko and Mladen Vouk
  7. When Good Machine Learning Leads to Bad Cyber Security by Tegjyot Singh Sethi and Mehmed Kantardzic
  8. Corporate Security is a Big Data Problem by Louisa Saunier and Kemal Delic
  9. Big Data: Business, technology, education, and science by Jeffrey Johnson, Luca Tesei, Marco Piangerelli, Emanuela Merelli, Riccardo Paci, Nenad Stojanovic, Paulo Leitão, José Barbosa, and Marco Amador
  10. Big Data or Big Brother? That is the question now (Closing Statement) by Jeffrey Johnson, Peter Denning, David Sousa-Rodrigues, Kemal A. Delic