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Peter J. Denning, Editor in ChiefThe digitally connected world has become a large, swirling sea of information stripped of context. We help our readers make sense of it, find meaning in it, learn what to trust, and speculate on our future.

Peter J. Denning,
Editor-in-Chief

 

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LATEST ARTICLES

Interview

Students tackle the routing problem for in-traffic emissions tests

Interviewed by Walter Tichy

Vehicle emissions tests used to be done entirely in the laboratory. However, certain car manufacturers cheated on those tests. In response, the European Union introduced emissions tests in real traffic. To make such tests meaningful, they must be performed on routes that meet certain criteria, such as the difference in elevation between start and end points and the proportion of urban and country roads. Finding suitable routes is a complex search problem. Undergraduate students from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany, developed the first fully automatic solution for finding such routes. In this interview, they share how they did it.

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Interview

A conversation with Marianna Obrist: using touch, taste and smell in virtual and augmented experiences

Interviewed by Bushra Anjum

In this series of interviews with innovation leaders, Ubiquity Associate Editor and software engineer, Dr. Bushra Anjum sits down with Marianna Obrist, who is exploring augmented and virtual reality within the context of HCI. Obrist discusses multi-sensory interactions that go beyond sight and sound, as well as her work that explores the role of human senses in the design of future technologies.

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department

If you write it better, you will say it better

July 2019
by Philip Yaffe

Preparing a good text for reading and preparing a good text for speaking are often considered to be unrelated activities. This is incorrect. A good text for reading and a good text for speaking are distinct, but they are not alien. They are complementary. ...


Article

Repairnator patches programs automatically

July 2019
by Martin Monperrus, Simon Urli, Thomas Durieux, Matias Martinez, Benoit Baudry, Lionel Seinturier

Repairnator is a bot. It constantly monitors software bugs discovered during continuous integration of open-source software and tries to fix them automatically. If it succeeds in synthesizing a valid patch, Repairnator proposes the patch to the human developers, disguised under a fake human identity. To date, Repairnator has been able to produce patches that were accepted by the human developers and permanently merged into the code base. This is a milestone for human-competitiveness in software engineering research on automatic program repair.

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