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Peter J. Denning, Editor in ChiefThe digitally connected world has become a large, swirling sea of information stripped of context. We help our readers make sense of it, find meaning in it, learn what to trust, and speculate on our future.

Peter J. Denning,
Editor-in-Chief

 

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LATEST ARTICLES

Interview

An interview with Katie Schuman: on the future of neuromorphic computing

Interviewed by Bushra Anjum

The whole objective of most speeches is to convey information, or to defend or rally people to a point of view. Gestures and tone may help inspire people to adopt your point of view, but is non-verbal communication truly 93% of all communication? ...


Communication Corner

How to instantaneously improve your speaking voice

by Philip Yaffe

The whole objective of most speeches is to convey information, or to defend or rally people to a point of view. Gestures and tone may help inspire people to adopt your point of view, but is non-verbal communication truly 93% of all communication? ...



Interview

An interview with Indrajit Roy: toward self-correcting systems

February 2019
Interviewed by Bushra Anjum

Indrajit Roy is a staff engineer at Google. He is currently working on peta-scale distributed databases. Previously, he was a principal researcher at HP Labs where he led the development of Distributed R, an open source HP product that brings the benefits of parallelism to data scientists. Roy received his Ph.D. in computer science from UT Austin. He is also an inaugural member of the ACM Future of Computing Academy.

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department

Silence is golden, especially when you need to say something important

February 2019
by Philip Yaffe

Each "Communication Corner" essay is self-contained; however, they build on each other. For best results, before reading this essay and doing the exercise, go to the first essay "How an Ugly Duckling Became a Swan," then read each succeeding essay.

How well you speak will always be an indicator of how well you know the subject at hand. And while nerves can often lead novice speakers to resort to distracting sounds and placeholders, a second or two of silence will help focus you as well as your audience. In this installment, Philip Yaffe reminds us that silence is golden.

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