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2014 Symposia

A Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

To organize a symposium, please read our guidelines.

 

Ubiquity Symposium: The Multicore Transformation

Table of Contents

  1. Opening Statement, by Walter Tichy

  2. Waiting for Godot—The RIGHT Language Abstractions for Parallel Programming Should be Here Soon,  by Wolfram Schulte

  3. Auto-Tuning Parallel Software, by Thomas Fahringer

  4. Engineering Parallel Algorithms, by Peter Sanders

  5. GPUs: High-performance accelerators for parallel applications, by Mark Silberstein

  6. Multicore Processors and Database Systems, by Kenneth Ross

  7. The Future of Synchronization on Multicores, by Maurice Herlihy

  8. Making Effective Use of Multicore Systems: A software perspective, by Keith Cooper

  9. Closing Statement, by Walter Tichy

Ubiquity Symposium: MOOCs and Technology to Advance Learning and Learning Research

Table of Contents

  1.MOOCs and Technology to Advance Learning and Learning Research Opening Statement,  by Candace Thille

Section 1: Technical and Scientific Innovations in MOOCs

  2. Assessment in Digital At-scale Learning Environments, by Piotr Mitros, Anant Agarwal, and Vik Paruchuri

  3. Offering Verified Credentials in Massive Open Online Courses, by Andrew Maas,Chris Heather,Chuong(Tom) Do, Relly Brandman, Daphne Koller,and Andrew Ng

  4. Data-driven Learner Modeling to Understand and Improve Online Learning, by Kenneth R. Koedinger, Elizabeth A. McLaughlin, and John C. Stamper

Section 2: The impact of MOOCs on Residential Institutions, Courses and Computer Science Education.

  5. MOOCs on and off the Farm, by John Mitchell

  6. Limitations of MOOCs for Computing Education: addressing our needs, by Mark Guzdial

Section 3: The MOOC Phenomenon and Higher Education

  7. Can MOOCs Help Reduce College Tuition?, by Stephen Ruth

  8. The MOOC Spring, by Frederick Siff

  9. MOOCs: Symptom, not cause of disruption, by Lewis Perelman

  10. The MOOC and the Genre Moment, by Michael Feldstein

Ubiquity Symposium: The Technological Singularity

Table of Contents

  1. Opening Statement by Espen Andersen

  2. The Singularity and the State of the Art in Artificial Intelligence by Ernest Davis

  3. Human Enhancement—The Way Ahead by Kevin Warwick

  4. Exponential Technology and The Singularity by Peter Cochrane

  5. Computers versus Humanity: Do we compete? by Liah Greenfeld and Mark Simes

  6. What About an Unintelligent Singularity? by Peter J. Denning

  7. Closing Statement: Reflections on A Singularity Symposium by Espen Andersen

 

 

Symposia

2018
  • Big data: big data for social science research

    Academic studies exploiting novel data sources are scarce. Typically, data is generated by commercial businesses or government organizations with no mandate and little motivation to share their assets with academic partners---partial exceptions include social messaging data and some sources of open data. The mobilization of citizen sensors at a massive scale has allowed for the development of impressive infrastructures. However, data availability is driving applications---problems are prioritized because data is available rather than because they are inherently important or interesting. The U.K. is addressing this through investments by the Economic and Social Research Council in its Big Data Network. A group of Administrative Data Research Centres are tasked with improving access to data sets in central government, while a group of Business and Local Government Centres are tasked with improving access to commercial and regional sources. This initiative is described. It is illustrated by examples from health care, transport, and infrastructure. In all of these cases, the integration of data is a key consideration. For social science problems relevant to policy or academic studies, it is unlikely all the answers will be found in a single novel data source, but rather a combination of sources is required. Through such synthesis great leaps are possible by exploiting models that have been constructed and refined over extended periods of time e.g., microsimulation, spatial interaction models, agents, discrete choice, and input-output models. Although interesting and valuable new methods are appearing, any suggestion that a new box of magic tricks labeled "Big Data Analytics" that sits easily on top of massive new datasets can radically and instantly transform our long-term understanding of society is naïve and dangerous. Furthermore, the privacy and confidentiality of personal data is a great concern to both the individuals concerned and the data owners.

2017
  • Big Data and the Attention Economy: Big Data (Ubiquity symposium)

    While attention has always been prized above money, few people have had the means to attract it to themselves. But the new digital economy has provided everyone with a loudspeaker; thus efforts at getting noticed have rapidly escalated in global society. The attention economy focuses on the mechanisms that mediate the allocation of this scarce entity. Social networks and big data play a role in determining what is noticed and acted upon.

2016 2015
  • The Importance of Cross-layer Considerations in a Standardized WSN Protocol Stack Aiming for IoT: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    The Internet of Things (IoT) envisages expanding the current Internet with a huge number of intelligent communicating devices. Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) integrating IoT will rely on a set of the open standards striving to offer scalability and reliability in a variety of operating scenarios and conditions. Standardized protocols will tackle some of the major WSN challenges like energy efficiency, intrinsic impairments of low-power wireless medium, and self-organization. After more then a decade of tremendous standardization efforts, we can finally witness an integral IP-based WSN standardized protocol stack for IoT. Nevertheless, the current state of standards has redundancy issues and can benefit from further improvements. We would like to highlight some of the cross-layer aspects that need to be considered to bring further improvements to the standardized WSN protocol stack for the IoT.

2014 2013 2012
  • Ubiquity symposium: The science in computer science: computer science revisited

    The first article in this symposium, which originally appeared in the Communication the ACM, is courtesy of ACM President Vinton Cerf. Earlier this year, he called on all ACM members to commit to building a stronger science base for computer science. Cerf cites numerous open questions, mostly in software development, that cry out for experimental studies.

2011
  • Ubiquity symposium: What have we said about computation?: closing statement

    The "computation" symposium presents the reflections of thinkers from many sectors of computing on the fundamental question in the background of everything we do as computing professionals. While many of us have too many immediate tasks to allow us time for our own deep reflection, we do appreciate when others have done this for us. Peter Freeman points out, by analogy, that as citizens of democracies we do not spend a lot of time reflecting on the question, "What is a democracy," but from time to time we find it helpful to see what philosophers and political scientists are saying about the context in which we act as citizens.

  • Ubiquity symposium: Biological Computation
    In this thirteenth piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Melanie Mitchell discusses the idea that biological computation is a process that occurs in nature, not merely in ...
  • Ubiquity symposium: Natural Computation
    In this twelfth piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Erol Gelenbe reviews computation in natural systems, focusing mainly on biology and citing examples of the computation that ...
  • Ubiquity symposium: Computation, Uncertainty and Risk
    In this eleventh piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Jeffrey P. Buzen develops a new computational model for representing computations that arise when deterministic algorithms process workloads ...
2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000