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Symposia

A Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

To organize a symposium, please read our guidelines.

 

New in Ubiquity Symposia: 

"The Science in Computer Science"

Previous Ubiquity Symposia:

"Evolutionary Computation and the Processes of Life"

"What is Computation"

 

The Science in Computer Science Table of Contents

  1. The Science In Computer Science Opening Statement, by Peter Denning

  2. Computer Science Revisited, Vinton Cerf

  3. ACM President's Letter: Performance Analysis: Experimental computer science as its best, by   Peter Denning

  4. Broadening CS Enrollments: An interview with Jan Cuny, by Richard Snodgrass

  5. How to Talk About Science: Five Essential Insights, Shawn Carlson

  6. The Sixteen Character Traits of Science, by Philip Yaffe

  7. Why You Should Choose Math in High School, by Espen Andersen

  8. On Experimental Algorithmics: An Interview with Catherine Mcgeoch and Bernard Moret, by Rick Snodgrass 

  9. Empirical Software Research: An Interview with Dag Sjøberg, University of Oslo, Norway, by Walter Tichy

  10. An Interview with Mark Guzdial, by Peter Denning

  11. An Interview with David Alderson: In search of the real network science, by Peter Denning

  12. Natural Computation, by Erol Gelenbe

  13. Where’s the Science in Software Engineering?, by Walter Tichy

  14. The Computing Sciences and STEM Education, by Paul Rosenbloom

  15. Unplugging Computer Science to Find the Science, by Tim Bell

  16. Closing Statement, by Rick Snodgrass and Peter Denning

  

 

 

 



2014