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Collective intelligence
include the disabled for success

Ubiquity, Volume 2008 Issue February | BY Bill Tipton 

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Full citation in the ACM Digital Library

Are you looking for new ideas to leverage your IT to allow your workforce to collectively be more efficient at solving complex problems? Want to transform your corporation so that it can reach new heights?


Are you looking for new ideas to leverage your IT to allow your workforce to collectively be more efficient at solving complex problems? Want to transform your corporation so that it can reach new heights?

And do you want to utilize all of your resources at their fullest potential, no matter how different some individuals might be perceived to be? Then maybe you should study the way some ants bury their dead, the ways fireflies in some parts of the world light up in synchronization, or the way field honey bees fly from flower to flower, collecting pollen and sweet juices, or nectar to produce honey. Read on; I am serious!

You would not want to develop inferior software or hardware products that are not accessible or usable by all people. In this highly competitive global market it is best not to limit your customer base to only a portion of the world's population allowing your competitors to gain an advantage in which you may never have the opportunity to catch up.

Collective intelligence in one definition is interacting as one large, self-organized group of computers or groups of people with all individuals fully participating, without infrastructure limitations. This is an emergent behavior, where complex group actions arise from simple local rules.

Read on to see how, if all individuals can fully participate efficiently, will achieve greater success in one component of collective intelligence.

To learn more about collective intelligence and see how it could transform IT, read the complete article at "Collective Intelligence - Include The Disabled for Success".


Source: Ubiquity Volume 9, Issue 7 (February 19, 2008 - February 25, 2008)

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