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2012 Symposia

A Ubiquity symposium is an organized debate around a proposition or point of view. It is a means to explore a complex issue from multiple perspectives. An early example of a symposium on teaching computer science appeared in Communications of the ACM (December 1989).

To organize a symposium, please read our guidelines.

 

Ubiquity Symposium: Evolutionary Computation and the Processes of Life

Table of Contents

  1. Evolutionary Computation and the Processes of Life, Opening Statement, by Mark Burgin and Eugene Eberbach

  2. Life Lessons Taught by Simulated Evolution, by Hans-Paul Schwefel

  3. The Essence of Evolutionary Computation, by Xin Yao

  4. On the Role of Evolutionary Models in Computing, by Max Garzon

  5. Evolutionary Computation as a Direction in Nature-inspired Computing, by Hongwei Mo

  6. The Emperor is Naked: Evolutionary Algorithms for Real-World Applications, by Zbigniew Michalewicz

  7. Darwinian Software Engineering, by Moshe Sipper

  8. Evolutionary Computation and Evolutionary Game Theory, by David Fogel

  9. Evolutionary Computation in the Physical World, by Lukas Sekanina

10. Some Aspects of Computation Essential to Evolution and Life, by Hector Zenil and James Marshall

11. Information, Biological and Evolutionary Computing, by Walter Riofrio

12. Towards Synthesis of Computational Life-like Processes of Functional and Evolvable Proto-systems via Extending Evolutionary Computation, by Darko Roglic

13. What the No Free Lunch Theorems Really Mean: How to Improve Search Algorithms, David Wolpert

14. Perspectives and Reality of Evolutionary Computation, Closing Statement, by Mark Burgin and Eugene Eberbach

Ubiquity Symposium: The Science in Computer Science

Table of Contents

  1. The Science In Computer Science Opening Statement, by Peter Denning

  2. Computer Science Revisited, Vinton Cerf

  3. ACM President's Letter: Performance Analysis: Experimental computer science as its best, by Peter Denning

  4. Broadening CS Enrollments: An interview with Jan Cuny, by Richard Snodgrass

  5. How to Talk About Science: Five Essential Insights, Shawn Carlson

  6. The Sixteen Character Traits of Science, by Philip Yaffe

  7. Why You Should Choose Math in High School, by Espen Andersen

  8. On Experimental Algorithmics: An Interview with Catherine Mcgeoch and Bernard Moret,by Richard Snodgrass

  9. Empirical Software Research: An Interview with Dag Sjøberg, University of Oslo, Norway, by Walter Tichy

  10. An Interview with Mark Guzdial, by Peter Denning

  11. An Interview with David Alderson: In search of the real network science, by Peter Denning

  12. Natural Computation, by Erol Gelenbe

  13. Where’s the Science in Software Engineering?, by Walter Tichy

  14. The Computing Sciences and STEM Education, by Paul Rosenbloom

  15. Unplugging Computer Science to Find the Science, by Tim Bell

  16. Closing Statement, by Richard Snodgrass and Peter Denning

  

Symposia

2017 2016 2015
  • The Importance of Cross-layer Considerations in a Standardized WSN Protocol Stack Aiming for IoT: The Internet of Things (Ubiquity symposium)

    The Internet of Things (IoT) envisages expanding the current Internet with a huge number of intelligent communicating devices. Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) integrating IoT will rely on a set of the open standards striving to offer scalability and reliability in a variety of operating scenarios and conditions. Standardized protocols will tackle some of the major WSN challenges like energy efficiency, intrinsic impairments of low-power wireless medium, and self-organization. After more then a decade of tremendous standardization efforts, we can finally witness an integral IP-based WSN standardized protocol stack for IoT. Nevertheless, the current state of standards has redundancy issues and can benefit from further improvements. We would like to highlight some of the cross-layer aspects that need to be considered to bring further improvements to the standardized WSN protocol stack for the IoT.

2014 2013 2012
  • Ubiquity symposium: The science in computer science: computer science revisited

    The first article in this symposium, which originally appeared in the Communication the ACM, is courtesy of ACM President Vinton Cerf. Earlier this year, he called on all ACM members to commit to building a stronger science base for computer science. Cerf cites numerous open questions, mostly in software development, that cry out for experimental studies.

2011
  • Ubiquity symposium: What have we said about computation?: closing statement

    The "computation" symposium presents the reflections of thinkers from many sectors of computing on the fundamental question in the background of everything we do as computing professionals. While many of us have too many immediate tasks to allow us time for our own deep reflection, we do appreciate when others have done this for us. Peter Freeman points out, by analogy, that as citizens of democracies we do not spend a lot of time reflecting on the question, "What is a democracy," but from time to time we find it helpful to see what philosophers and political scientists are saying about the context in which we act as citizens.

  • Ubiquity symposium: Biological Computation
    In this thirteenth piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Melanie Mitchell discusses the idea that biological computation is a process that occurs in nature, not merely in ...
  • Ubiquity symposium: Natural Computation
    In this twelfth piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Erol Gelenbe reviews computation in natural systems, focusing mainly on biology and citing examples of the computation that ...
  • Ubiquity symposium: Computation, Uncertainty and Risk
    In this eleventh piece to the Ubiquity symposium discussing What is computation? Jeffrey P. Buzen develops a new computational model for representing computations that arise when deterministic algorithms process workloads ...
2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000