All posts by Lewis Perelman

Dr. Lewis Perelman has more than 40 years of experience focused on the processes of innovation and transformation, as a strategic analyst, consultant, author, publisher, teacher, and thought leader. Dr. Perelman has written, edited, or contributed to 13 books and over 100 other publications. As an author, Dr. Perelman produced School’s Out, a best-selling book based on the research project he directed at the Hudson Institute. His first book, The Global Mind, was cited as one of the best scientific/technical books of the year by The Library Journal. For over four years, he was Executive Editor of Knowledge Inc., the leading management newsletter on organizational intelligence. He was the first non-journalist accepted to membership in the National Press Club. www.perelman.net

Spike those “Luddite” Awards: Not all innovation is good

Frame-breakers, or Luddites, smashing a loom. Machine-breaking was criminalized by the Parliament of the United Kingdom as early as 1721, the penalty being penal transportation, but as a result of continued opposition to mechanisation the Frame-Breaking Act 1812 made the death penalty available.
Luddites attacking powered looms, 1812 (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

The Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF) published its annual “Luddite Awards” for 2014 and 2015. These would-be rogues galleries target organizations or individuals who, in ITIF’s judgment, “did the most to smash the engines of innovation.”

Continue reading

Can Robots Be Trusted?

Robby the Robot embodied Asimov’s robotic laws. The robot also provided an early demonstration of self-driving cars.  Watch this a clip from the 1956 movie, "Forbidden Planet," which introduced Robby the Robot to the public.
Robby the Robot embodied Asimov’s robotic laws. The robot also provided an early demonstration of self-driving cars. Watch this a clip from the 1956 movie, “Forbidden Planet,” which introduced Robby the Robot to the public.

In “Self-driving cars and the Trolley problem,” Tanay Jaipuria provides an interesting and valuable examination of some of the dilemmas posed by trusting automatons such as self-driving vehicles to take care of people: Continue reading